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t.ó

Chap.

3

2.

An

E.rpó

&tion

upon

the

Book,

of

Jos,

fi'erf,

p

Gourd;

is

an

argument

of

undue

love to felfe.

When

God fpared

Ninevc/rthe

Prot

:het was

exceeding

angry,(.'on.

4. a.

)

But his

-was

fîntull anger

;becauf

he.

was angry

for his

ownefake,fearinú

ro be

calieda

tall

,

Prophet

;

He fet

himfelfe

donne

to

fee

what

tvoúld

become of the

City,

that

he might

have

'a

perfonall glory,

and be cryed up for

a Prophet

indeed. And

when

God

had

Emit-

ten

his

Gourd,

he was angry and angry unto the death

(Ter.

8.

)

and

all

becaufe hemiffed that which

plea-fed

himfelfe.

Many can

be

angry when

they themfelves

are.difcredited,

but when

dilho-

now.

'is

cal}

upon

-God,or

his

interefl flighted,

how

quiet

and

tame,

how

cold

and

dull are

their fpirits

!

The

anger

of this

man

was

a

noble anger,

as

to

the

occafion and

rife of ir,

Jobs felfe

-:ju-

flirication,

or-

Becaufe

6ìe

jug

if

ed

himfelfe

rather

¡ben God.

This

is

a

high

parr;

and

May

juflly provoke our

anger,

EChi

was

not

angry

Sob

becaufe he

'juflified

himfelfe;againll

his

friends, but

becaufe hé

juflified himfelfe rather then

God.

Here

.a

queftion

will arife, and

it

will

ask

fome

paints to

de-

termine

it;

Was

this

true?

did

7'ob

;uflifie himfelfe

rather

then

God

?

Was

it

poffible

Tob

should do

fo'?

I

(hull give

only

a

gene=

ral'1

antwer

to

this

queflion;7ob'did

not

juflifie

himfelf

ratherthen-

God,either

explicitely,

or

intentionally, but 'byconfequents` he

did.

And though

irbe

granted that lob

gave jufl

ocóofiorí

of

this

fharp

reproofe

by his

rash and paflìonate

fpeeches,

uttered

in

the

`heateof

difpi

te,

and

in the grief of

his

heart,yet it

cannot

be

de-

',tiled

that

El

hu'ìd

foiiaewhat flrain

fobs

words, though not

be-

yond-their lence, yet beyond

his

fence,and

gave

them

the hardefl

interpretation

(

fomewhat befide

the

rule

of

charity

)

which

they

could'beare,

-nor

did

he cbferve that meeknefíe and moderation

'Which

might

well have

become him, to

a

man in

that

cafe.

O

how

:hard

ie

it

not to

of

e

;rd

or

doe

ill; while.we

are

doinf

well

!

.

To

cleare

this

á

little

:further confider

,

There

is

a

twofold

ftraining of

Words

;

Firíl,beyond the

fence

of

the words fpoken;

Secondly,beyond the

fence

of the

fpeaker.

I

doe not

fay

Elihia

in affirming

thisof

Job, flrained his words beyond

their

fence,

but

he

flrained them beyond

fobs

fence.

fob

fpake

~Words

which

'might'

lay

him

under

this cenfure,

that

he

jufi-ified

himfelfe rather

tken

God

;

But this

was

-far

froth his

intention;

For doubtlefle

he

had