Background Image
Table of Contents Table of Contents
Previous Page  12 / 378 Next Page
Basic version Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 12 / 378 Next Page
Page Background

e

a.e

dious,

for

any

Chriilians,efpecially

fuch

as

pretend

to be

proteflants,

confidently to alfert, and boldly

to

publiíh

to

the world,

as

Mr.

Hobbs

doth

in his Leviathan,

(a

book

deigned

by

him,

as

I

have

been informed, to corn,

element

Gromwel,

againft

the writer's

own

confcience,

fuch

as

it

was)

p.

168.

ghat

no

private

man

is

judge

of

good

and

evil

actions

in

a

common

wealth,

under

civil

laws;

and

that

the

meafure

of

good

and

evil

aelions is the

civil

law (of

aCions

civilly

good, why not

?

but

of

aElions

limply good

and evil (as his

affcrtion carries)

why

?

what

reason,

or fhadow

of

reafon

?

God

never

having given,

nor

aíligned fuch

a

rule

;

we

may

thus

throw

away

our

Bibles,

as

the rule

of

good and evil

aEtions,

and

all

be-

take

ourfelves

to

the civil

law

as

the

only

rule)

and

the

legifluitor

the

alone

judge

;

fince

he

may

as

well

diveft

a

man

of

human

nature and

un

-man him,

as

deprive

him

of

a

private judgment

of

difcretion, or

of

a

private

dif

cretive judgment

in

reference

to his own

adions

;

the

fober

exercife

whereof

is

no affuming to

himfelf

in

the

leafs

the

capacity

of

a

publick

judge. And

if

at any

time,

in

any

thing relating

to his

own

ads,

this judgment of

private difcretion

fall to

thwart

the

law

or publick judg-

ment,

he

adventures

on

t

hat

cum periculo,

or

on

his

peril;

but

it cannot

in

reafon

utterly

rob him

of

it,

fince

(as

is

faíd)

he can

as

faon

ceafe to

be

a

man,

or

a

rational

crea-

ture,

as

to have

that quite denied

him, or

taken

from him.

And,

to

what

end

or

purpofe thould

he be privileged

with

this above

brutes,

if

the exercife

of

it íhall be for

ever fufpended

in

the members

of

kingdoms

and com-

'mon-

wealths,

as

almoft

all

men in

the

world are

?

what

found

and

orthodox divine,or

found

Chriftian lawier

ever

taught

fuch

c

oa[rine

?

The

learned

Dr.

Ames tells us,

in

the

4th corolary,

and

very

laf

words

of

his

firft book

of

Cafes

of

confcience,

That

interpretatio

fcripturx,

vel

jug

dicïum

difcer

ere

voluntatem

Dei,

pertinet

ad

quemlibet

in

foro

confcientix pro

fcsneteip

fo.

And,

page

i

69.

of

the

forecited book,

the

fame

Bcbbs

lays,

'That

he

who is

fub-

jec7

to

río

civil

law,

linneth

all

that

he

doth

again

ft

his

confcience

;

yet

it

is

not

fo

with

him

2vho

liveth

in

a

com-

mon-wealth,

becaufe

the

law

is

the

publick

confcience

Which

Teems

to

be

inconfitent

with,

if

not

point-blank

con-