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to

the

Reader.

xi

contradietory unto,what the

apaftle

exhorts to,

Rom. 14,

5

Let

every

man

be

fully pertvaded

in

his

own

mind,or

con-

fcience,

to

wit,

of

the warrantablenefs of what

he

doth

and,

to

what

he

afferts,

v.

23.

TVhatfoever is

not done

is

frith

(or

from

this full

perfwafion

of

its

warrantable

-

nefs)

is

fin. He

doth

not

furely write this

to

Chriftians

in

Utopia,

or

in

the

fancied

new

world

in

the

moon

;

but

to

thofe who were

really prefcnt members

of

the

Ronzan

common-

wealth, or fubjeets

of

that empire

;

neither

can

it

with

any

thew

of

reafon he

ilappol'ed

(efpecially

by

Iim,wh

^,in

the ¡train

of

his

hook,as to this

matter,

makes

very

little,

or

rather

no

difference

at

all be

twixt

a

Hea-

then

and

Chr

f

ian magiftrate

;

for whether the magiftrate be

Pagan,

-Wahornetan,

5ew

,

Chr

f

ian,

Poprlh

or

Protef

ant,

Heretical

or

Orthodox,

feems

to be all

one

to

him

and his

followers

in

this

debate)

that

if

the

Roman

emperor had

been

Chriflian,

he would have

written otherwife

;

or

that

his

becòming

fuch,

would

enervate,

yea,

quite eva-

cuate

the

firength

and

obligation

of

what he writes

For

he delivers

it

as

an

eternal

and

unalterable

verity, rule

-who

will,

and

be

the

civil

Iaws

what

they

may be

And

while,

in

the

13

chapter

of

that

fame

epiftle,

he

telleth

Chrif$ians,

v.

5.

That

they

mull

needs

be

fubjeft,not

only

for

wrath,

but

alto

for

confcience

fake;

He

feems

very

clearly

to diftinguith betwixt the

law

and command

of

the civil

power

(which Mr,

Hobbs

calleth the

publick

confcience)

and

the

confcience

of

private Chriftian fubjeEs, and

to

preis

upon them

fubjeétion

to the

higher

powers,

for

their

own

confcience

fake, and

fo

to

leave

to them fame

ex-

ercife and

judgment

of

that their

confcience

concerning

the

matter

of

their

obedience and

fubje&ion

a

Otherwile

the

obedience and

fubjeftion

could not well

be faif-`to

be

for

confcience

fake, or out

of

confcience

;

for

he-

might

fhortly

have

laid,

Obey

the dictates

of

the

publick

èoh

c

-'nee,

or

the

laws

of

the fuperior

powers,

there

being

no

place

for

the

exercife

of

the confcience

of

private

fubje6ts

in

the

matter.

There

is

one

divine

(inch

as

he

is)

who,

in

hiÿ

cclef

aftick polity,

more lately delivers the

fame

doctrine

wherein

he

not

only

plainly

Hobbizeth,

but

alfo

palpably

playeth

the

plagiary,borrowing,(not

to fay

ffealing)

much

Of

what he lays to

this

purpofe

through

his

book from

Mr.