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Xii

The

El

We

Mr.

Hobbs,

thon

in force

few

things he oppofeth

him,

and delivers

his

fentirnents in

a

finer drefs

of

language.

It

may

be, that

none may

think that

he

is

beholden

to

the other,for

that

which

he would

furprize

the world with

as

his own

new and

profoundly

witty invention, vainly

as

it

were

crying,

:

Let

them, for

me, (hare

betwixt

them this glorying

in

their

own

íhame,

that

fhall

not

be

rolled

away.

He

Pays,

That,

in

matters of

religion,

and

divine

worfhip,

fubjec`t`s

are

to

be

ruled

by

authority

and

the

publick

confcience

;

and

that,

in thefe

matters, private

men

have

not

power

over

their

own actions,

nor

are

to be

dire

tied

by

their

own

judgments,

but

by

the commands

and

determi-

nations

of

the

publick

confcience

;

only

with

thefe

lorry

re-

ffritions,

If

the

things

commanded

do

not

either

countenance

vice,

or

difgrace

the Deity

;

or

if

the

things

be

not abfolute_

¡y

and

effentially evil,

whofe

nature

no

cafe

can

alter,

no

cir-

cumfiance can

extenuate,

and

no

end

can

fanai

fy.

Mr.

Hobbs

hath

only this

limitation,

If

the things

be

not

againfi

the

law

of nature

:

In

eífe&

both

come

near to the

fame,

if

not

to

the very

fame

amount

;

and

by both

an

obliga-

tion

is

pleaded to

ly

on

the

confciences

of

all

private

Chriftian

fubje&s,

to give

up

themfelyes to the

conduét

and regulation

of

the

publick

confcience,

or

of

the laws

of

the

common-

wealth,

as

to many,

at leaff,

of

the

pofitive

commands

of

God,

doing

contrary

to

which will

not

fall

within

the

compafs

of

thefe

very narrow

limitations

;

which either

fuppofeth, without

any

warrant or

proof;

that

the publick

confcience

is

always

infallible

as

to

thefe

(And

it

is

worthy noticing what the learned

Monfieur

Claude

hath

to

this purpofe

in his

defence

of

the

refor-

mation,

where

he

faith,

In

eee5t

an

ahfolute

obedience

and

entire

re

fgning

of

one's

Pelf

to

the

conduct

of

another

in theft

7natters

that

regard

the

faith

and

the

confcience,

is

a

duty

that

we can

law

fully

tender

to none

but

to

God, who

is the

frf

truth,

the farfi principle

of

all

juflice,

to

which

none

can

pretend without ufurping the

full

right of

God: As

is

allo,

what faith

1Amefius,

Page 6th

of

his

Cafes,

cTbat the

confcience is

immediately

fubjett

to God,

and

to

his

will,

and

cannot

fubjeet

itfelf

to

any

creature without idolatry.)

Or

it

is

the

fhort

cur,

and

compendious

way to

debauch

wens confciences,

and to

drive

all

confcience

out

of

the

world;