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to

the

Reader

trainable

in the concerns

of

men,

all

which

comparative..,

1y

are

but

trifles

?

Might

not

all

Chriflian martyrs

of

old,

and proteftant

ones

of

late, by fuch obedience

to

their

refpe&ive lawful

fovereigns, in

the

several

parts

of

the

Chriflian world,have

efcaped

and

delivered

themfelves

from being

burnt

alive,and from

other bloody,violent and

cruel deaths,

and exquisite torments

?

And shall

they-

not,

according

to this

detestable

do&rine,

be

looked ar,

as

a

company

of

filly

fools,

who

needlefly

threw

away

their

lives,

which they might

thus have

very

eafily

preferved?

For

none

of

them, we

know

of, were

ever

by

their

popish lawful fovereigns

injoined,

to

fay

with

¡their tongue,

ghat

they

believed

not

in

Chr

;

which

yet,

faith

he,

they

might

and should

have

done,

(keeping

their

mind to themfelves, and to

God)

and much

more

thole

things

which they

were commanded.

Further,

Page

239,

240,

241.

he

refers

to

the

decision

of

the

sovereign, all

forts

of

do

&rive

in

effe

&, and more

par-

ticularly

and

exprefly,

Whether

the

fubje

&s

'hall

pro-

fess,

That

life eternal and

happinefs

(hall

be

on

the

earth

only

?

Whether

the

foul

of

man

is

a

living

creature,

inde-

pendent

on

the

body, or

loth

fuhfiJ

feparately from the

bo-

dy

?

Whether

any

mere

man

is

immortal,

otherwife

than

by

the refurreltion

of

the

lafi

day?

Whether

wicked men

shall

be

tormented eternally,

fo

as

not

to be

deflroyed,

to

die,

and

he

annihilated

at

length?

(to

all

which

himself

feemeth

to

be

inclined

as

his own

opinions

;

O wicked

and

wretch...

ed!

O

atheistical, detestable and

damnable

opinions

!

)

Whether,

I

fay,

the

fubje&

shall

profefs

thefe

things,

or

not,

he refers

to

the

decision

of

the

fovereign

;

by

which

we

may

very

eafily

judge

in how

many,

and in

how

very momentuous things

in

Chriilian

religion

he

©bligeth

fube&s,

as

to

their outward

profeffion

and

carriage,

to (land to,

and acquiefce

in,

the

decision

and

determination

of

the lawful

fovereign in

a

kingdom,

or

common-wealth,

or

of

the

publick Confcience,

or

law

of

the

land

;

which,

whether

it

be

not

to deny all

confci_

ence to

fubjetis

and

private perlons,

in

fuch matters

as

fo

nearly concern

the

eternal falvation

of

their immortal

fouls,

is

obvious

at

firfl blush.

It

puts

me

in

mind

of

what

is

reported

of

a

great

map

(1'uieiliug

prong

of

this.