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o

dd

the

1Veder

xix

by

;

that

aEtion

is not

his, but

his

foverei

rn's

;

nor

is

it

he,

that

in

this

cafe deníeth

Chr

/,

but

his

fovereign

and

the

law

of

his

country.

And,

p.

309.

The

civil fovereign

may

make

laws

fuitable

to

his

doc`Irine

(for

he

will have

him

to

be the

only fovereign

teacher

of

the

people, that

are

under

him

jure

divino

;

which

quite

nulls

the

divine

right

of

all

the

minifters

of

the Gofpel)

which may

oblige

men

to

fuch

actions,

as

they

would not otherwife

do,

and

which

he

ought

not

to

command

;

and

when

they

are

com-

manded,

they

are

laws,

and

the

external

anions

that

are

done

in

obedience

to

them,

without

the

inward

approbation,

are

the

actions

of

the fovereign,

and

not

of

the

fubjet,

who,

in

that

cafe, is

but the

inflrument,

without

any

motion

of

his

own

at

all,

becaufe God

hath

commanded

to

obey

them.

Alas,

the

poor

fubje

&,

is

here by

him, not only

robbed

of

his

judgment

of

privare difcretion

and confcience,

as

to

his

own

ads,

which

is

hard

enough

;

but, in

a

manner,

ofa

human

rational

foul,

if

not alto

of

a

fentitive

one

;

and

fo

degraded

and

detruded

below

the very

beajls

that

pe-

ril!)

:

For

he

makes

him

a

mere

innflrument

without any

?notion

at

all

;

only he fomewhat

recovers him from

his

brutal,

yea,

infra

-

brutal

{tare,

by

making

him

capable

to

obey commands,

tho'

againfl his confcience.

The

o-

ther

Hobbifb

DoEtor, who

will

not

be

outflript

by his

snafler,

according

to

his

manner, di&ateth very magifle-

rially, That,

if

there

be

any

fin

in

the

command

of

the fove-

reign power,

he

that

impofed

it

¡ball anfwer

it, and

not

Ì,

whole whole

duty is

to

obey

;

the

command

of

authority

will

warrant

my

obedience, my

obedience

will

hallow,

at

leafs,

excufe my

anion,

and

fo

fecure

me

from

fin,

if

not

from

er-

ror.

Very

eafy,

loft

and

fmooth

dodrìne

indeed, for

private perlons

and fubje

&s,

if

its

teachers could affure

us

of

its

certain

and

infallible

truth,

and

of

its

confo--

nancy and agreeablenefs

with

the

fcriptures

of

truth

;

but

fubje&s muff nor

call

their

fouls

at

hap-

hazard,

on

the

bare and unproved

afferts

of

thefe

gentlemen, who

give

us

no

great

proof

of

either their

truth

or

tendernen

in other great

concerns

of

religion

;

efpecially

fince

the

divinely infpired apoille teacheth

us

quite other

do&rine,-

while

he

tells

us,

more

generally,

z

Cor.

5.1

o.

That

we

muß all

appear

(or

be

made manifelî)

before

the

judgment