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the

!tie

wers,

was,

when

Tiberius,

Caligula,

Claudius,

and

Ne-

ro

were

Roman

emperors

;

none

of

whom were

the

beftg

nor near the

belt,

even

of

Pagan

emperors

;

and

fome

of

them

were

very

monfters

of

men.

Only

it would

be

carefully looked

to, that

foundations

be not

fhaken and

put

out

of

courte,

and

that

ancient boundaries and land-

marks be

not removed

;

which

no

Chriftian

civil

love.

reigns, in

kingdoms

or

common-wealths,

keeping

them

-

felves

in

the line

of

due and

juff

fubordination

to

the

Majefly

of

God,

the

great

and abfolute Superior

and

Sovereign,

the King

of

kings,

by,

and

under whom,

all

kings

reign,

will

allow

of, or

give

way

unto,

whatever

unhallowed

Hobbits

profanely and impioufly

fuggeft

to

the

contrary

:

Whofe

principles

(whatever they pretend

to grant

to

the

civil fovereigns

of

kingdoms and

com-

mon-wealths) have

a

manifeft

tendency

to

the unhinging

and

utter

diffolving

of

all

government.

For,

let

us

in

Thort

but

fuppofe

thefe four

things,

which

Hobbs

very

magilterially,

tanquam

ex

tripode,

dietates

and takes

for

granted

in his

forecited book

:

¡fl,

That

all

religion

is

bottomed

on

human

authority,

and

precarioufly borrow-

ed

from

the

will

and

pleafure

of

men, and

hath

no

di-

vine

authority

of

its own

;

whereby

(as

ingenuous and

acute

Sir Charles I'oolfly,

in

his

Unreafonablenefs

of

Athe-

ifm,

fays)

An inroad

is

n

ade

upon

its

befi

defence;

for

in-

deed

(faith

he)

it

will

never

be

kept

up

with

any

other

in-

terefl

in the

ccnfciences

of

men;

and

where

it

is

not

fuppor-

ted

by co;nfcience,

it

is

ever

tottering, and

yields

to

the blafls

of

every

human

pleafure.

llc

once

(faith the

fame

learned

gentleman) it

be

taken for

granted,

that

the fériptures

have

no

authority but

what

the

civil power

gives

them,

they

quill

foon

come

upon

a

divine

account

to

have

none

at

all.

2dly,

That

the

apoftles

could not

make

their

writings

obligatory

canons

without the help

of

the

fovereign ci-

vil powers

;

and

that therefore the fcripture

of

the

new

tef}ament

is

the

only law

there,

where the

civil power

makes

it

fo

As

if, forfoath,

the divine

authority

ifam-

ped thereon

by

the abfblute Sovereign,

by

the great

and

-infallible

degilator, carried

with

it

no

immediate obli-

gallon

on

the

confciences

of

men,

to

whom it comes, to

receive and obey

it

as

his law,

knofoever

b

licvetb

(faith

Sir