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to

the Reader.

xxiii

Sir

Charles

Ioo

fly) that

it

is

in the power

of

every

fate,

whether

the gofpel

(hall

be

authentick

or

not, he

null

needs

throw

off

all

divine

refpec9 to

it,

and

be

in

a

very

fair

way

to trouble

himfelf little

with

any

devotion

aril

ng

from

it.

idly,

That

there

is

no

diflin&ion

of

good

and

evil

a

&i-

ons

but

by

the

civil law,

which

is

unto

him

the

meafure

thereof,

thou

this diftin&ion

of

good

and

evil be

deeply

and indelibly

engraven

on

the

hearts

of

all men,

as

a

na-

tive and

neceffary

refult

of

the faith

of

the being

of God,

as

the

fupreme re&itude.

4thly,

That

there

are

no

ul-

tra

mundum,

or eternal

rewards or punifhments, nor

any

beyond or

betide thefe

that

are beftowed

or

infli

&ed

by

the

civil

power

in

this

prefent

life;

thou,

from

the

be-,

ginning

of

the world,

throughout

all

ages,

experience

bath

given, in

full demonftrative

and

undeniable

evi-

dence,

that

men have

been

mightily impelled

and

encou-

raged to

do good

by the

hope

of

future

eternal

rewards,

and proportionably

refrained,

pulled

back, and

deter-

red

from

doing

evil,

by

the fear

of

future

and

eternal

punifhments.

If

(I

fay)

we

once

fuppofe thefe things

we

quite

ruine

and

raze

the

great foundations,

not

only

of

revealed and

fupernatural,

but

allo

of

natural religion

without which

it

is

impoffible,

that government amongft

Men

can have any

lure or

firm

bafis

to ref''

on,

but

muff

needs, according to the

prevalancy

of

t}leir

Pelf

interefls,

crumble

into pieces, and end

in

anar4lir

and

confufion.

It

is

not

altogether unworthy

of

remark

here,

that

Hobbs

runneth quite

crofs to

the di

&ates

of

famed

Machiavel,

that ,prodigy

of

profound policy,

thou

but

a,

very coarfe divine,

who labours

much

in

his

prince

to

perfwade fovereign

civil powers

of

the

neceffity

and

ad-

vantage, for the fupportance

of

government,

of

diffem-

bling and

pretending,

at leaf'', a

great regard

and

vene-

ration

to

religion

;

.

in

comparifon

of

whom,

the

other is

but

an

impolitick puny,

and a

far

worfe

divine,

even

(if

it

involved not

a

repugnancy)

a

diabolick

one.

Fifthly,

We

would

take heed

that

we

do not

f`upinely

and carelefly negle&

and

flight the

checks, challenges,

rebukes

and

accufations

of

our

confciences, in

leáfer

things, or

in

matters

of

comparatively (mailer

moment

(wherein yet

confçience

bath

a

concern,

as

it

hash

in

B4

all