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xxvi

2-rho

i

f

le

fanity

and

mongers

of

mifchief, and

even

in

a

manner

brings up hell upon

earth,

when

it

becomes habitual,

and

when

God judicially

gives men

up

to

their

own

hearts lulls,

and

to

walk

in

their

own

counfels,without

all

regard

to

what he

fays to

them, by

his

word

without

them,

and by

their

own

confciences within

them.

Seventhly,

We

would

carefully

advert, that

we

adven-

ture

not

to

do any

thing

with

an

unclear,

hefitant

and

doubting

confcience

fince it

is

impoffible in

this

cafe

to

do without

fin

and

hazard

of

damnation, the Holy

Ghoft

having pofitively

and

plainly told us,

that

what-

foever is

not

done

in

faith

it

fin, Rom.

14.

23.

that

is, not

only

whatfoever

is

not done

by

a

perfon

in

a

gate

Of

faith (without

which

it

is

impoffible to pleafe

God)

is

fin.;

but alto,

and molt agreeable to

the fcope,

whatfoe-

ver

is

not

done

in

the faith

and perfwafion

of

the

warrant

-

ablenefs,thereof,

is

fo

;

and

that

he

who thus

doubtingly,

and without fuch

faith and perfwafion,

eateth, or doth,

is

damned, or judged.

Ibid.

It

will

nor

afloil

the

doer

doubtingly, or

the

doubting

doer

from

fin

and judgment,

to tell

him

that

his confcience

is

in an

error,

and

that

he

is

not

to

regard what

his

erroneous

confcience

di

&ates to

him,

but

to

a& contrary to

it.

'Tis

true indeed,

that

an

erring

confcience

doth

not

oblige a man to a& according

toits

blind and

erroneous

di

&ates

;

for

a

man never is,

neither

can

be, obliged

to

fin

;

he

is

rather

bound

to

en-

deavour,

in

God's way,

to

have

his

confcience,

when in

an

error,

undeceived and well

-

informed,

and

fo

to

lay

a-

fide

his

error

;

but

yet while

his

confcience

í1i11

continu-

eth

in

its

error,

and

cometh

not to be informed

aright,

the

man

is

bound

up

fo,

that

he

cannot

without

fin

coun-

ters&

the

di

&ates

of

his

erring

confcience,

which

is

not

for

the

time

apprehended

by him to be

in

an

error.

Nei..

ther

will

it

relieve the

man

whole confcience doubteth

of

the

law

fulnefs

of

doing fuch and fuch

a

thing,

to

tell

him

that

more

knowing

and confcientious, more

prudent

and

pious men

than

he, are free and

clear

for the thing

whereof

he

doubts

;

for

other

mens

confcience

can be no

rule

to his,

'unlefs he

were perfwaded

of

tli+ir

infallibili-

ty,

and

that their

confcience could

not be taken

with

any

error

or

:

,iffake.

God

bath

put

a confcience in

evrry

azr