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t4

the

KKeaaer.

xxix

it

was

to the

apof"le

(whofe

exercife

it

was

to have

always

a

confcience

void

of

offence

towards God

and

toward

men)

who

faid,

Who

is

offended,

and

Í

burn not?

Ninthly,

We

would

take

heed to, and

be

aware

of

pre-

tending

,confcience

in

any

thing,

about

which

we

have

no

real exercife,

doubt or fcruple

of

eonfcience,

As

for

inflance,

in

the firft

place,

If

profeffors

of

religion

Ihould

pretend

confcience,

for

abflaining from

filch

and

fuch

a

pra

&ice, only from long

cuflom

of

doing fo,

from the

example

of

others,

or

from lothnefs

to

dif-

'

pleafe

them, or

only

from diuinclination

to,

or

aver-

fion

from,

the thing,

which

they

will

not readily

abide

by,

if

any

confiderable fuffering,

whether

of

emergent

lofs,

or

ceffant gain be

met

with

on

account

thereof

;

whereby

it

comes

to

pats

that

confcience, and

truly

confciencious

perlons, are

expofed to contempt and

fcorn

:

Some

ffanders

-by,

and

lookers

-on, taking

occafi-

on to

think

and fay,

that

fuch perlons

have

all

the while

been

a

&ed by no

real

principle

of

confcience,

but

only

by

humour, or

at

belt

by the

example

of

others, to

the

great reproach

of

religion,

and

the holy

profeffion

there

of

;

and fuch

as

have

a

natural and unreafonable

preju-

dice at

all

ferious godlinefs

and

tendernéfs

of

confci-

ence,

ly

at

the

wait

to

fith and

catch all advantages,

fo

fortifying tìemfelves

in

their

prejudice,

and

are

ready

to

draw their

concluflons

not only, nor

fo

much againff

the particular

perlons,

as again!"

the

whole

generation

of

confcientious and

godly people

;

yea,

again!"

godli-

nefs

itfeif,

and tendernefs

of

confcience

;

their pre -

judice

prompting

them to

think

and fay,

We

always

thought

that,fort

of

men were

not

truly

confcientious

and

godly,

whatfoever

they

profeffed

;

and

now we fee

and

find them to

be

fo, and

that

we

were not miftaken,

but

in

the

right,

when

we

thought

to

be fuch

:

They

are

all

filch,

all

of

a

piece, a&ed by

no

true principle

of

confcience,

but

by

humour,

peevifhnefs,

or

fome

fuch

thing,

notwithf"anding

of

all

tiìfir

high

-flown

pretenfi_

ons

of

confcience

;

for,

let them

but be put

a

little

to

its

and

all

their

confcience- pretenfions

will be

quite

re-

linquiihed

and

evanith,

and

they

will

be and

do

like

ethers;

which

gives

ground

to

lober

and truly confG-

et.