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í

rxxii

e

j>z

e

not

in

the

Ina

incompatible with

the

fan&

ification

thereof;

as

if

they

themfelves

had

been more

tender

of

the

due obfervation

of

the

fabbath,

than

either

the dif-

ciples,

or their

Lord

and

Mailer

was

?

7thly,

(to

give

no

more

inftances)

When

Confcience

is

pretended

for

keep

-

ing,

and not

breaking

of

finful

engagements,

vows

and

oaths wherewith

men

have

rattily bound

themfelves

;

as

fuppofe

a

man

fhould

rafhly

vow

and

fwear,

that

he

will

be

avenged at

the

higheft

rate

on

another,

becaufe

of

either

an

imagined

or

real,

a

leffer

or greater

injury

done

him

;

and

as

Herod

fware, very inconfiderately

and

rafhly, that

he

would give

the

dancing

daughter

of

the

inceftuous

mother

Herodias,

whatever

the

íhould

ask

of

him,

even to

the

half

of

his

kingdom

;

who

asking,

at her

mother's

inftigation,

the head

of

john

the baptifi

(which

was

of

more

worth than

the

whole, let be the

half,

of

his

kingdom) and

he

judging himfelf

bound by

his

oath

to

grant

her delire,

accordingly

gave

order

('tie

faid, for

his

oath's

fake)

to the executioner to

behead

him

in

the prifon, without

any

trial,

or

'fo much

as a

hearing

;

though

it

was

indeed

againft

the light

of

his na-

tural

Confcience

;

he having been convinced,

that

he

was

not

only

an

innocent,

but

alfo

a

jufi

man and

holy,

and accordingly

obferved

him,

and

did

many things

en-

joined

him

by

john,

and heard

him

gladly

:

As

if

un-

lawful and finful'.oaths,

rafhly

come

under,

could in

con

-

fcience

bind

men

to a&

againft

the

plaineft

and

molt

palpable

ditates

of

their

own

Confcience

;

whereas they

ought

rather

to

repent,

and

pray for

the

pardon

of

fuch

engagements,

vows

and

oaths,

and

forthwith

to

break

them,

lince

`Tu.ramentum

nunquam

potefi

efe

vinculum

ini-

quitatis

;

An oath

can

never

be

a

bond

of

iniquity,

or

oblige men

in

Confcience

to commit

what

is

palpably

a

fm.

tenthly,

We

would be aware,

that

we

do

not

incon-

fiderately, rafhly

and

precipitantly

adventure

upon

any

a

&ion, or meddle with

any

bufinefs, efpecially

of

mo-

ment,

before

deliberate and

ferious confulting

with our

Confcience

;

(endeavouring

always

to

have

it

well

in-

formed

by

the word) which

either

makes

many

.uch

aelin

s

and meddiings to

be afterwards

refle&ed

ot