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1C3C

dv

the

.pifile

fcience

;

which

in common

difcourfe, without

any

the

lead

neceffity,

is

fure

more

than,

T

a

and

Nay,

and

fo

ac-

cording

to the

Lord's

own

determination (precifely

to

be

flood

too)

cometh

of

evil.

Neither

will

they really

be

found

to

be

amongff

the tendereft or

molt

truly

religious and

confcientious perlons,

whatever

be

their

profeffions of,

or

pretenfions

to, religion or

confcience,

to whom

this

is

mofi familiar

;

for by this cuftomary and

habitual

folemn

afferting every

light,

minute,

and

trifling

matter

(when

withal

it

is

offenfive

to

tender

ears)

men may

be

tempted

in other

things to make too

bold

with

their

confcience,

which they thus

debate,

if

not,

even

upon

fuch

petty

occafions now

and then

to (wear by

it

:

Confcience is

a

very,

tender thing,

and would be very

tenderly

dealt

with,

and

in

nothing

in

the

leaft

bourded

or dallied

with

and

we

are exprefly commanded to

ab[larn

from

all

ap-

pearance

of

evil,

i Thefl.

5.

v. 22.

Twelfthly,

and

finally,

We

would

by all

means

take

heed

and beware

that

we

do not mock, deride

or

flout

at

confcience and confcientious perfons

(which

no man

that

bath

any

confcience will

dare

to

do, nor

to

deny the

power

of

it

Nay,

the Atheift

himfelf

(as

Sir

Charles

Wooly faith well)

cannot

with

all

his

skill

disband

his

own fears,

nor run

away

from

his

confcience,

no

more

than he

can

run

away

from

himfelf;

he

finds

feafons

wherein

he fmarts

under the

lathes

of

it)

nor take

up,

entertain

and

harbour

any

prejudice and pique

at

them,

gs

if

fuch,

by the

tendernefs, doubts

and fcruples

of

their

confciences,

difturbed

the

repofe, peace, tranquillity,and

free

aLing

of

all

the countries, corporations

and

focie

ties,

greater

and fmaller, wherein they live;

and

made

a

very unpleafant, uncheerful

and

difquieted

life to the

perfons

themfelves

:

Or

to

think that

it

were

a

great

ad-

vantage

to

the world,that

all

fuch

perfons were out

of it,

or

cluttered

together

by themfelves

only,

in fome

remote

corner

of

it;

for

whofe nice and

ftait

-lac'd

(as

they

call

it)

confcience,

and

its

enquiries, fcruples

and

doubts,

they

cannot get

leave

to live

quiet,

and

to

at

with

that

freedom

they-would

be at. Alas

!

if

fuch

had

their

delire,

and all

doubts,

checks and

reffraints

of

confcience

were

and dil}r

lion

would

from

men,what

confufion,

da

the