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on

A

&s 24.

16.

5

5

firíi place;

but

that

which

we

are

now

fpeaking

to,

is

concerning taking

advice

from

Confcience,which,

i.

Doth

make the

Law

fpeak more fenfibly, lively and

aloud, than

before.

a.

It

maketh

it fpeak

more

plainly

;

for,

when

peoples reafon

will be

ready

to

fluffle by

a

word,

that

fame

word

coming

into,

and

taking

hold

of

the

Confci-

ence,

will become

more clear

and

convincing, and

it

maketh

the underftanding,

being

thereby

made

more

fingle,

to

take it

up better.

3.

It

maketh

the

man

more

impartial,

when

the word

cometh not to his

judgment

only

:

Neither

will he leave

the:word

with

his

light and

reafon fimply, nor

to

debate with

his

inclination

and

of

feetion

;

but

putteth

the

word and

his

Confcience

toge-

ther,

and

taketh the

meaning

of

it

fame

way

immediate-

ly

from his

Confcience

;

it

maketh

him

fingle

and

unbiaf-

fed

(as

I

fail

before

;)

and

fometimes

as

Confcience will

fpeak, when

the judgment hath little or nothing

to

fay,

fo

it

decideth

often

betwixt

the

oppofite reafonings

of

the

judgment for

both

fides.

4.

The

advice and

dictate

of

Confcience

is

much

more

powerful than that of the

Pimple

judgment

and reafon,and adhereth

better

and more

close

-

ly

than

affection

or inclination. Confcience being

more

direEtly God's

deputy,

and

in

a

more immediate

fubor-

dination to

him,it

flicked'

more

tenacioufly by

duty

;

and

it

being

as

a

check

to

our humours,

and

as

a

compafs

to

fleer

our

contle

by in all

things,we

are to

be

fwayed by

its

advice

;

hence force, who can almoll

debate,

nothing

in

reafon,yet will

not

dare

for

Confcience

to do

fttch

a

thing.

Some

neceffaiy

icef

ions

relating

to

pra:ice

arifè from

this

Ufe,

which

we

fhall fpeak

a

few

words to

;

As,

r.

If

any

other thing

betide Confcience

may

have

an

impulfe

to

duty

?

a.

If

other

things

may

have

an

impulfe to

duty

(whether

it be

credit,

interef,

inclination, will,

or

af-

fe

&ion) how

may

the impulfe

of

tilt-Se

be

difcerned and

differenced

from

the

impulfe

of

Confcience

?

3.

Whe-

ther

the dielates

of

Confcience

may

always

be

followed,

Being

its

impulfe

may be

wrong

?

4.

What

flaould

be.done

in

Inch

a

cafe,

and

how may

we

difference

what

is

right

?

5.

Whether

a man

and his

Confcience may be

friends

and

agree

together,

in

a

wrong

caufe

or

practice

?

For

the

firfl

,

ej/iov,

Whether

any

thing

betide

Con-

D

4

f`cietic.