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icience

loth

or

may

push

to

duty

?

We

anfwer

afiirma;

tively, Many

things

may

court

us,

which by their impulfe

do

often

thwart with Confcience;

hence

is

the inward

combate

in

the

Chrifiian betwixt

the

flefh

and the

Spirit;

the

fl.efh

doth pufh

to

one

thing,

and

Confcience

to the

contrary

:

Therefore,

Gal.

5.

17.

'tis

laid, fhe

flee

lujieth

againnfl

the

Spirit,

and

the Spirit

againfi

the

flefi,

and

thefe

two are

contrary

one to

another

;

and

Rom.

7.

2.3.

the A-

pofile

fpeaketh

of

a

law

in

his

members rebelling

againfl

the

law

of

his

mind,

and

leading him captive

to

the

law

of

fin

in his

members.

More particularly,

thefe things

(as

we

hinted

before)

may

have

an

impulfe

toward the

doing

of

duty

;

as,

firfl,

Mens

credit

hath

a

firong impulfe, where

any

thing

croffing

it

is

apprehended

to

occur.

2.

Mens

intereft hath

often an

impulfe,

fo

as

to

Gaary

on

a

felfifh

defign

;

it will make gain

Teem

to be

godnefs.

3.

Mens

natural

inclinations,

will

and

affections,

have

an

impulfe

alto ;

and

the impulfe

of

there

will fometimes

be

exceed-

ing

like,

to

the

impulfe

of

Confcience.

And here

we

may

confider

thefe

three

things which

they

have

influence

up-

on

;

i.

They

may have influence to

mar

a

mans

light,

and

pervert

his

underfianding

:

As

it

is

faid

of

a

gift,

It

blindeth the

eyes

of

the

wife,

and

perverteth

the

underfland-

ing

of

the

prudent;

fo mens

credit,

intereft, and natural

inclination,

may,

in

a

fort,

bribe

the

underftanding,

and

blind

the judgment

infenfibly,

and

the

man

not know

ofit

diflin&ly

at leaft,

a..

When

they have

perverted

the

judg-

ment, they

may engage

the

aflè

&ions,

and thefe

drive

vio-

lently.

3.

If

the

man

yield

not

to

fuch

a

thisg,his

credit or

intereft

will

vex

him like Confcience, and take refi

anti

quiet

from

him

;

as

we fee

in

Herod,

Matth. 14.9.

who,

when the dancing

damfel

fuited for the

head

of

fohn

the

Baptil,was

forry

(or

grieved)

neverthelefs

for

his

oath's

fake,

and for

them

who

fat

at

table with

him,

he

commanded

it

to

be

given

her.

Folk

would

have

thought that it

was

his Con-

fcience

that

made him

forry,

but

indeed

it

was

not

Con-

fcience,

but

credit

;

therefore it

is

faid,

not

only

for

his

aath's fake,

but

for

them

that

fat at

table

with

him.

'Tis

like,

if

his

oath had

been

given

in

private,

Confcience

would

not

much

have

troubled

him

;

antl

while

'tis

faid

be

was

ferry or

grieved)

it

iheweth

plainly

that

his

credit

fu%ered