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f

36o

]

was really

pofl'efl'ed

;

any

one, that

confiders the

State

of

the

Town

of

Nottingham, will

applaud

the

Proceedings

of

the

high

Cómmiflion.

`

By

this

'

Time

(lays

Mr.

Strype) it

came

to

pals, that the

People

of

Nottingham were violent

againti

one

another,

and the

whole

Town

divided

as

they

'

Good

affe

&ed.

The

Pulpits rang

of

nothing

but

Devils

and

Witches

;

and

Men, Women

and

Children were

fo affrighted,

that

they

durtt

not

'

ftir

in

the

Night;

nor

fo

much

as

a

Servant, al-

'

moll, go into

his

Matter's Cellar,

about

his

Bu-

'

u

nets, without Company.

Few

happened

to

be

tick,

or

ill

at

Eafe, but

(trait they

were damned

to

be

poffeffed."

'Twas

high

Time

to

put

a

Stop

to

this

Pra&ice

of

dilpoíleffing,

whether

the

Au-

thors

were Knaves,

Enthutiatts, or

both,

Mr.

N.

is

at

Liberty to continue

thefe Pra&itioners

in

the

Litt of

Puritans, which

this

Inftance

plainly thews,

he

is

detrous

to encrealè with all Clergymen that

were

punithed,

whatever

was the

Reafon

of

it.

Mr.

Allen

beforementioned

is

an

In(lance

of

another

Sort

;

this

Gentleman,

by

the

Malice

and

Revenge

of

one

of

his

Parithioners,

happened

to fall

under

an

unreafonable Profecution.

Mr.

Allen,

Mr.

N

himfelf allows,

was

a

good

Preacher,

had

fub-

fcribed,

was

well

liked by

the Bijhop,

and

conform-

able

in his

Affections.

How

comes

this

Gentle-

man

to

be a

Puritan,

or

why

is

he

mentioned

as

fuch,

except

to fwell

their

Number

?

With

what

Propriety could

Mr.

N.

after fuch

Profecutions,

cry

out,

Thus

the

Puritan

Clergy were

put

upon

the Level with

Rogues

and

Felons.

Darrell,

and

his

Affociates,

may

be

Puritans,

if

their

1-liftorian

pleafes;

but fure,

a

fubfcribing

Minitter, conform-

able

in his

Afèdions,

ought

not

to

be

added

to

that Lift.

The

Reader, from thofe few Obfervations that

have

been laid

before

him, will

be

able to

judge,

what fort

of

a

Hiftory

of

the

Puritans

has

been

offered

to

the

World.

He

is

likewife

defired

to

obferve, that

the

chief

Deign of

thefe

Papers

is

to

fupply the Defects,

and

corre& fome Miftakes

in

that