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44

jir

DISPLAY

Of

alp,

ure creatures-

of

Gód, holy

and undefiled

with

any fin,

to

be invefted

with the

fàme,

,etchednefs

and perverfenefs

of

nature, with our

(elves.

It

is

not my

intention, to enter into

any curious difèourfe, concerning

the

fiate and

grace

of

Adam before his fall

;

but only to give

a

faithful affent, to what God himfelf

affirmed

of

all

the

works of his hands,

they

were exceeding good

:

no evil, no defor-

mity, or

any

thing tending thereunto, did immediately

iffùe from

that

fountain

of

goodnefs and

w

ifdom, and

therefore

doubtlefs man,

the

mofì excellent work

of

his hands,

the

reateft glory

of

his creator,

was them

without

fpot

or blemifb,

endued with

all

thole

perfe£tions his

nature,

and

flate

of

obedience,

was

capable

of

and careful we

mutt

be

of

caning

any afperfions

ofdefeft

on

him,

that

we will not

with equal

boldnefs

afcribe to

the

image

of

God.

Nothing doth

more mauifeft

the

deviation

of

our nature from its firft inflitution,

and

declare

the

corruption wherewith

we

are

polluted, than that

propenfrty which

is in us

to

every thing

that

is

evil,

that

inclination

of

the

flefh,

which lufteth

always agairft

the

fpirir,

that

luft and concupifcence, which fomenteth, conceiveth, hatcheth, bringeth

forth,

and

nourifheth fin;

that

perpetual pronnels that

is in

unregenerate nature,

to

eve-

ry

thing,

that

is

contrary

to the

pure

and

holy

law

of

God. Now

becaufe

neither

fcri-

pture

nor

experience will

fuffer

clirilbans quite

to

deny this pravity

of

our nature

;

this

averfenefs from all good,

and

propenfrty

to

fin,

the

Arminian;

extenuate

as

much

as

they are

able, affirming

that

it

is

no great

matter,

no more than Adam

was fubje£t

unto

in

the

Rate of

innocency. But

what, did God create

in

Adam

a

prennefs unto

evil

?

Was

that

a

part

of

his glorious image, in whole likeneO

he

was

framed?

Yea,

faith

Corvinur,

(a)

By

reefer'

of

hiscreation man

had an

afilion

to

what

was

forbidden

by the

lam

:

but

yet

this Items

injuftice,

that

God lhould

give

a

man a law

to

keep, (b) and

put

upon his

nature

a

repugnancy

to that

law,

as

one

of them

affirmed at

the

fynod

of

Dart..

No,

faith

the

former

author

:

(c) Man

had not

been

fir

to

have

had

a law given

unto

him, had

he

not

beenendued

with

a

proppenfion,

and

natural

inclination

to

that

which is

forbidden

by

the lam

;

but

why

is

this

fo neceffary

in men,

rather than

angels?

No

doubt

there

was a

law,

a

rule,

for

their

obedience, given unto

them at

their

fait

creation, which feme tranfgreffed,

when others

kept it

inviolate.

Had they

alfo

a

propenfrty

to

fin,con-

created with

their

nature

?

Had they

a

natural

affe£tion

put

upon

them

by

God,

to that

which

was

forbid-

den by

the

law

?

Let them only who will

be wife

beyond

the

word

of

God,

affix filch

injuftice

on

the

righteous

judge

of

all

the earth

:

but

fo

it

feems

it man

be

:

(d)

There

was

an

inclination in man

to

fin

before the

fall,

though

not altogetherfo vehement and inordinate

as

it

is now,

faith

Arminira

s

hitherto

we have

thought,

that

the

original righteoufüefs,

wherein Adam was

created, had comprehended

the

integrity and perfe£tion

of the

whole

man

; not only

that

whereby

the

body wasobedient unto

the

foul, and all

the

áffe£tionsfubfervient

to the rule

of

reafon for

the

performance

of

all natural

aftions

:

but

alfo

a

light,

uprightnefs,

and holinefs

of

grace,

in

the

mind and will, whereby he

was enabled

to

yield

obedience

unto God,

for

the

attaining

of that

fupernatural end,

whereunto

he

was

created. No; but (e)

original righteoufnefs,

fay

our

new

doctors,

was

nothingbut

a

bridle

to help

to keep

man's inordinate

concupifcence

within

bounds

r

fo

that the

fa-

cultiesof

our fouls were

never

indued with any

proper

innateholinefs

of

their own:

(f)

In

the

fpiritual

death

of

fm there are

no

fpirieualg'fts

properly wanting

in

mill, becaufe they were

never there,

fay

the

fix

collocutors at

the

Hague.

The

filar

is,

man

was

created with

a

nature,- not only

weak,

and

imperfe£t,

unable

by its native ftrength

and endowments

to attain that

fupernatural end,

for which

he

was

made, and which he

was

commanded

to

feek, but

depraved

alfo with

a love and

defire

of

things repugnant

to the

will

of

God,

by

muffin

of

an imbred inclination

to

fin-

ning.

It

doth

not properly

belong

to

this place, to

Phew,

how

they

extenuate rhofe

gifts

al

fo,

with which they

cannot deny

but

that

he

was

mdued,

and alfo

deny thole

which he had

;

as

a power

to

believe in

Chrill, or to

affent unto any

truth, that

God

fhould reveal

uh:to

him

:.

and

yet they grant this privilege

unto every one

of

his pofleri-

ty,

in

that depraved

condition

of

nature, whereinto

by fin

he

call

himfelf

andus. We

(e)

Ex redone

creations

homo habebat affeflum

ad ea qua vetabantur,

Cor.

ad

Mot. ap.&

f

(b)

Dens homini

repugnantiam indidit adverfus legem,

Yob. G

ll.

in

foes.

aenfef(.

(r)

Homo

non

ell

tioneu,

cui lex

feratuy ,uando

in eo, ad

id

god

lege

vetatur,

non

eft

propenlo,

ac inclinatio naturally

Cor.

ad

:nlin.

cap. ro.

fef}.

rg. ( d

)

Inclinatio ad peceandum

ante

lapfum

in trominefuir,

Hoot

non

ita

veham^ns or inordinate

no

turn,eft, Armin.

adArtir.

ßefpon

(e)

30ßfä0

osiginalis inflar

fce,i

fuir,

quad

rafteliat

interns

concnpifcenrra ordinationem,

Cor.

ad

Mel.

a.

8. ¡.

(f)

lo fpiritoali

moms,

on feparantur proprie

dona

fpiritualiaa

voluntate, quia ilia nunquam

fueriut

eiinGta,

lie..

mû.

Hag.

fol.

ago.

have