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ARM,INIANISM.

45

have alLnow

a

power

ofbelieving

in

Chrift,

that

is,

Adam by his falI

obtained a

fppëï`,

natural e:.dowment, far more excellent than

any he had before

;

and

let

themnot here'

pretend the

taiiverfality

of

the

Ilere novel rant,

: .161 they

can

prove

it,

and

I

am

certain'

it

will

be

long

e.

gh

fe

it

but this

I

fry,

belongs of to this place only

let

us

e,

how

from

the

f

o`God

We

may

overthrow the

fo

met odiousherely.

God in

the b a(

rag

ice.

red reca

in

his own imams,

Ge,.

i.

26

that

is,

oriihs,

L.cclef.

vii.

29.

le:d w'.qi

a

nature

compote) to ab-dence

and

i linefs

:

that habitual

grace,

and

original riahtcoufitcfi, wherewith

he

we, mvefìed

i

ill

'i

manner due

unto'

fiim,

for

re

'.

aini, g

ó;..Jaat

fingi

-natural

ei t

vilereunto

he was

create&;

and

uni:

verfal

re£l.itude

of

;di

the faculties

of

his

foul,

advanced

by

fniperi

animal

grates, ena-

bling him

to

the

performa.;te

of

aloft': duties whereunto

they wet

e

rugaired,ìs,'

thatwhich

we

call

the

íínincency

of

our

full

parents.

Our

nature

was

then enclined to good

only,

and

adorned

well

al

f

f

bole qualifications,

s,

that wee

s

eelfkl'y

to

make

it

accept

able

unto"

God,

and

able to d-'

what

was

required

of

us

by

the

law, 'under the

conditiomdfevef

-'

lofting happiets.

.

Nature, aid

grace, or

original righteoutisefs, before the fall, ought

not

to

be

fo clittinguifhed,

as

if

the

one

were

a

thing

prone

to evil, refitted

and.queiled

by

tlin

ether

for both

comp'

i

lvent

"unifin and

harmony,

to

glf

"tns

along

in

the

way

ofcbedience to

eternal b'.elpcdnefir; no coatentiOn between

the'

and

the

fpirit,

but

as

all other

thiigs

at ;theirs,

fo

the

whole

man

jointly

aihièd

at

his anal

chit feil

gbod

hr

icg

all

.nears

of

attaining

it

in

lais

poser.

"

That

there

was

then

i

o

.

linatso

a

to

fin,

no

ceneupifcence

ofthat

which

is

evil,

no

repugnancy

to the

law

of'God in

the pure

nature

of

man

;.

is

proved,

b:tcaulè

I. The fcripturedefcrib'ng the condition

of

our nature, at the

firft

creation

there-

of,

intimates

no fueh

piopeufity

to

evil, but

rather

an

holy perfeetioii quite excluding

it

:

we were created

in

the image

of Gal,

tie

a

i. a7.

In

16th a perfè£t

uprightnefs,

as

rs

oppofite to

all

evil

iirvei.tiols,

Erelef

vii.

29.

To

which

image, when

we are

again'

in

fame meafure renewed,. by the

grace

of

Ghril,

Loanj.

üì.

lo.

We

fee

by

the fish

fruits,

that

it

confifted in righreoufnefs and

hollers

;

in

truth

and

perfect holinefe,-

Ephef.

iv.

a4.

..,

2.

An

inclination

tonsil,

and

a

lofting

after

that

which

is

forbidden,

is

that

inòi

di-

nate concupifcen:ce,

wherewith our

nature

is

now infe£

fed, .which

is

everywhere

in

the'

fcripture

condemned

as a

fin

:

St. Paul

in the

f

venth

to

the

'Romans,

adïrming

exprefsly'

that

it

is

a

fin,

and

forbidden by

the

law,

ver.

r. producing all manner

of

evil,

and

hindering all that

is

good

:

a body

of

death,

ver.

24. and St. Janes

maketh

it

even

the

womb

of

all

iniquity,-

amen

i. rq,

,ry.

Surely; our

nasure.wa,s

notat

firft

yoked

witb

fach

a

troublefome

inmate.

Where

is

the

upi

ightnefs and innocency

ive have

hitherto'

conceived our fief} parents

to

have

enjoyed before

the

fall?

A

repugnancy

to the law

muft

needs be

a

thing

fitful;

an

inclinatïcn to evil;

to

a

thing

forbidden,

is

an

anomy,

a

deviation,

and difcrepaacy

from.

the

pure.

and

holy

law

of

God, ; we

mud

fpeak no

more

then

of

the

haie

Ofinnocency, but only

of

a

fhort )pace

whe'reiu

rio

outward

a

&ual

fins were

committed.

Their

proper

root,

if

this

he

true,

was

concreated

with

our

nature:

is

this that

obediential harmony

to

all

the

commandments

of

God

w

ch

'

is

necelfary for

a

pure andinnocent creature,

that

Lath

a

law

preliribed

unto hlin

.

py

which

of the tea

precepts

is

this

inclination

to'evil required

?

Is

it

be

the

fah,

rhea

air

not cover?

Or

by

that fum

of

them all,

thou

fhalr live

the

Lord

thy God,

with

all

thy heart,

&c.

Is

this

all

the happinefs

of

paradife, to

be

turmoiled

ív

ids

a

entire

liivelling'

wìtn

abundance

of

vain defines

?

And with

a

main fiream carried

headlong

to

all

iniquity,

if

its violent appetite

be

not powerfully

kept

in

by

the bit

and

bridle

of

original rigirte-

oufuefs? (a)

So

it

is we fee

with

children cow,

and

fo

it

fsould

have

been

with them

in

paradife,

if

they were fùbje£t

to this

rebellious inclination

to

fin.

3.

And principally,

whence had

our

primitive

nature

this

atfe£fion

to thofe

things

that

were

forbidden

it

;

This

rebellion,

and

repugnancy to

the law, whichmud

needs:

be an

anomy, ai,d to

a

thing

fitful

?

There

was

as

yet

no

demerit, to

deferve

it

as

a

punilhment, what fault

is

it

to

be

created

?

(b)

The

operation

of

any

thing which hash'

its

original with

the

being:

of

the thing

itfelf,

mud

needs

proceed

from

the fame

caufe,

as

doth

the

effence

or being

it

felf;

as

the fire's tending

upwards, relates

to

the

fame

original

with

the fire

:

and

therefore

this inclination or

alfe&ion

can have no

other

au-

(a)

Vidi

ego zelantem

isarvulum

qui

nondnm

loquebatar, & intuehatnr

palfidus, amata

afpetlu

eolluftaneum.

alum,

Aug.

,

(b)

Operario, quo;

anal

inc

n

cum cite

rei,

eft

ei ab agente,

a qno

habeteffe,

lenity

moved

Curtain

inelt'igni

a

generánte, ¿Four. p. n99.

O

thor