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66

A

DIsPE,AY

of

.

thefe

wild

diversother

fuch

endowments, and excellent qualifications,

doth the

fcripture

attribute to this

idol, which it

calls

theold

man, as

1

(hall

more

fully difcover

in

the next

chapter

:

andis

notthis

a

goodly reed, whereon to rely

in

the paths

of

godlinefs

?

A

powerful

deity, whereunto

we may

repair, for

a

power

to

become

the

foss

of

God,,

and attaining eternal happinefs

?

The

abilities

of

free will

in

particular,

I fhallconfider

hereafter,

now

only, I

will by one

or two

reafons

thew,

that it

cannot

be

the

foie and.

proper

caufe

of

any

truly

good, and fpiritual

aft

well

pleating unto God.

(r.)

All fpiritual

aftswell

pleating unto

God,

as

faith, repentance,

obedience,

are

fupernatural

Iteth and blood

revealeth not thefe

things

;

Not of

blood, nor

of

the

will

of

theflefh,

ne,

of

the will

of

man

;

but

of

the

will

of

God,

John

r

3. That

which is born

of

the

fief:),

is

flefh ;

and that

which is

bori

of

the

fpirit,

is

fpirit,

John

iii.

6. now

to the per-

formance

of

any fupernatural

aft, it

is

required,

that the

produlbive power

thereof

be

alto fupernatural,

for

nothing hash

an

aftivity

in muting above its own

fphere,

nec.

'mbelles

generant feroces sgsilas

calmed.: but our free

will

is

a meerly natural faculty,

.

betwixt which,

and

thofe fpiritual fupernatural ails, there

is

no proportion,

unlefsit

be advanced above its own

orb

by inherent habitual grace. Divine theological virtues,

differingeven

in the

fubftaoce

of

the

aft

from thofe moral performancesabout

the

fame

things, to which

the

ftreugth

of

nature may reach (for

the

difference

of

ails, arifeth

from

their

formal

objeas,

which

to

both thefe

are divers)

waft

have

another principle

and taufe,

above all

the power

of

nature

:

in civil

things, and

a£tions morally

good, in

as much

as

they

are

fubjeft

to

a natural perception, and do

not

exceed

the ftrength of

our

own

wills;

this

faculty

of

free

will

may

take

place, but

yet, not without

thefe

fol.

lowing

limitations

:

Firff,

that

it always

requireth

the

general concourfe

of

God, where-

by

the

whole

fuppofstum

in which

free

will

hath

its fubftftance, may be fufloined

:

Matth.

x.

29, .30.

Secondly,

that

we

do

all

thefe things imperfe&ly and with much infirmity,

-every degree elfo

of

excellency

;

in thefe things muff

be counted a fpecial

gift

.

of

God

:

Ifa. xvi.

t 2.

Thirdly,

that

our wills are determined

by

the

will

of

God, to all their

alts

and motions in

particular

:

but

to

do

that

which

is

fpiritually good,

we have

no

knowledge, no power.

(z.) That

concerning which

I

gave one fpecial

reftame,

in

whole produ&

ion

the

.4rminians

attribute

much

to

free will,

is

faith

;

this

they

affirm, as I

Chewed

before,

to

be

inbred

in

nature,

every one having in

him

from his birth

a

natural

power

to

believe

in Chrift

and his Gofpel

:

for

(a)

Elifcopius

denies,

that

any afiion

of

the holy

Spirit

upon

the underftanding,or will,

is

neceffary,

or

promifed in the fcripture, to

make a man able to believe

the

word preached unto him

:

fo

that

it

feems, every man

bath at

all times

a

power

to

believe, to produce

the all

of

faith, upon the

revelation

of

itsobjell. Which

grofs

Pelegianifm

is

contrary

[t.]

To

the doarine

of

the

church

of

England, affirming

that

a man

cannot

fo

much

is

preparehimfelf

by

his ownftrengeh to faith

and calling upon

God, until the

grace

of

God

by

Chrift prevent

him

that

he

may have a good

will,

Artic.

[2.]

To

the

fcripture teaching

that

it

is

the

work

of

God

that

we do believe,

yohn

vi.

29.

It

is

oat

of

our

felves, it is

the

giftof

God,

Ephef:

ii. 8.

To

fame

it

is

given

to know

the

myfteries

of

the kingdom

of

heaven,

Matth. xiii.

11.

and what

is

peculiarly

given

to

fame,

cannot be

in

the

power

of

every one

:

to

you

it

is given

on

the

behalf

of

Chrift to

believe

cm

him,

Phil.

i. 29.

faith

is

our

accefs

or

coming

unto Chrift,

which none

can

do,

unlefs

the

father

draw him,

John

vi.

44. and he

fo

draweth,

or

hath merry,

on

whom he

will have

mercy,

Rom. ix.

t 9.

and

although

Epifcopius

rejefts

any immediate

altion

of

the holy

fpint,

for

the

ingenerating

of

faith, yet

St. Paul

affirmeth,

that

there

is no

lets elfeflual

power required

to

it,

than

that

which raifed Chrift from

the

dead, which fore

was an

aftion

of

the

almighty Godhead. That

we

may knew,

faith

he,

what is the exceeding

greatnefs

of

his

power to us

ward,

who

believe according

to

the

working

of

his mighty

power, which

he

wrought

in Chrif},

when

he

raifed

him from

thedead,

Ephef

i. 19, 20. fo

thatlet the

drminians

fay

what they pleafe, recalling

that

I write

to

chriftians, I will

fpare

my

labour

of

further proving,

that

faith

is

the

free gift

of

God

;

and

their

oppofition

to

the

truth

of

the

fcripture in this particular, is

fo

evident

to the

meaneft capacity, that

there

needs no

recapitulation,

to

prefent

the

film

of

it

to their

underflandings.

(a)

An

ulla

aaio

S.

S. immediate

in

mentem

ant voluntatem,

neceffaria fit, out in Scripture

promit-

tatur

ed

hoc,

ut

quis

credere

poQt verb°

ertrinfecus

propoGro, negativum taebimur,

Epr ¡rap.

difpat.

phut;

C

H

A P.