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ARMINIANISM.

69

died for us,

Rom. v..

6.

wife

to

do

evil, but to

do good we have no

firength,

no know-

ledge. Yea,

all

the

faculties

of

our fouls, by reafon

of

that fpiritual death underwhich

we are detained

by

the

corruption

of

nature,

are

altogether

ufelefs

in

refpe£t

of

any

power

for

the

doing

ofthat

which

is

truly

good

;

our uuderfiandingsare

blind

or dark-

ened,

being

alienated

gram

the

life

of

God, through the ignorance

that

is in

w,

becaufe

of

the

blindnefs

of

our

hearts,

Ephef

iv. 18.

whereby

we become even darknefs

it

felt;

chap.

v.

8.

void

is

the

underfianding

of true

knowledge,

that the

natural

man

receiveth net

the things

that

are

of

God,

they

are

feoliihmefs

unto

him,

e

Cor. ii.

14.

nothing

but

coo

-

founded and amazed at fpiritual things, and

if

he

doth

not mock,

can do

nothing

bur

wonder, andfay,

What

meanerh this

?

Ads

ii.

rz,

13.

We

are not only blind

in

our un-

derfiandings, but captives

alfo

to

fin in

our

wills,

Luke iv. 18.

whereby

we

are fervanes

to

fin, John viii. 34. free only

in

our obedience

to

that tyrant,

Ram.

vi.

yea,

all

our,

alfe&ions

are

wholly

corrupted, for

every

imagination

of

the thoughts

of

the

heart ofmania

evil

continually,

Gen. vi.

5.

while

we

are

in

the

flefh

the

motions

of

fin

do workin our

members, to bringforth fruit unto death,

Rom..

vii.

y.

Thefe

are the endowments

of

our nature, theft: are the preparations

of

our hearts

for

the

grace

of God, which

we have within

our

felves.

Nay,

(z.) There

is

not only

an

impotency, but

an

enmity

in

corrupted nature,

to

any.

thing fpiritually

good. The

things

that

are

of Ged,

are

foelifhne

s

unto

anatural man,

1

Cor.

ii.

14.

and

there

is

nothing

that

men do more hare, and contemn,

than

that

which

they account

as

folly.

They

mock

at

it

asa

ridiculous drunkennefs,

dtls

ii.

e

3.

and

would

to

God our daysyielded

us

not too evident

proofs

of

that

univerfal oppofition,

that

is

between

light

and darknefs, Chrifi and

Relial,

nature and grace,

that

we

could

not

fee

every day

the

prodigious

iffues

of

this

inbred corruption,

fwellirig

over

all

bounds, and breaking

forth

into

a

contempt

of the

Gofpel,

and

all

ways

ofgodlinef

r

fo

true

it

is,

that the

carnal

mind is enmity againfi God,

it

is

not fubjett

unto his

lam, neither

indeedcan

it

be,

Rom. viii.

7. fo

that,

(3.)

As

a

natural

man by

the firength

of

ilia

own

free

will,

neither

knotveth; nor

willeth,

it

is

utterly

impolfible

he

fhould do any

thing

pleating untoGod.

Can

the

Ethiopian

change

hisskin,

or rho leepnrd his

foes?

'Men can

be do

geed,

Jeremy xiii.

an

evil

tree

cannot bring forth

good,

fruit,

without

faith

it

io

impoJfble to pleafe

God,

Heb.

xi:

6.

and that

is

not

of

our

[elves,

it

is

the

gift of

Gad,

Ephef.

ii.

that though almighty God,

according

to the

unfearchablenefs

of

his wifdom,

worketh

divers ways,

and

in

fundry

manners, for the tranflating

of

his chofen ones from

the

power

'of-

darknefs

to

his

marvellous

light,

calling

fame

.powerfully h

the

midi

of theirmarch

in

the

ways

of

ungedlinef,

as

he did Paul,

preparing others

by

outward means, and helps

of

comniotr

ref raininggrace, moralizing nature before

it be

begotten

anew

by

the

irmnortal feed

of

the

word

;

yet

this

is

certain.,

that

all

good

in this

kind

is

from

his

free grace,

there

is

nothing

in

our

felves, as

of

our felves, but

fin

:

yea, and

all

thofe previousdifpofitions,

wherewith our hearts are prepared by virtue

of

common grace, do not

at

all

enable us

to

concur

by

any vital operation,

with

that

powerful bleffed renewing grace

of

regene-

ration, whereby

we

become

the

foes

of

God.

Neither

is

there

any difpofition unto

grace fo

remote,

as

that

pofiibly

it

can

proceed from

a

meer faculty

of

nature, for

every

fuels

difpoition, midi

be

ofthe

fame

order with

the

form

that

is

to

be

introduced;

but

nature

in

relpe£i

of

grace,

is a

thing

of

an

inferiour

allay, between which

there

is

no proportion

;

a

good ufe

of

gifts may have

a

promife

of

an

addition

of

more,

provi-

dedit

be

in

the

lame kind.

There

is

no

rule,

law,

or promife,

that

fhould make grace

due,

-upon

the good ufe

of

natural endowments.

you

will

fly,

here l quite

hver-

throw

free will,

which before

I

feemed

to

grant

;

to which

1

anfiver

i

that

in

regard

of

of that

objet,

concerning which now we

treat,

a

natural man hash na

fùch

thing

as

free

will

at

all,

if

you take

it

fora

power

of

doing

that

which

is

good and wellpleating:

untoGod

in

things fpiritual, for

an

ability

of

preparing our hearts untofaith and

calling

upon God,

as

our church article

fpeaks,

a

home-bred felf-fufficieocy, preceding

the

change

of

our

wills by

the almighty

grace

of

God, whereby

any good fhould be fold

to

.

dwell in us, and

we

utterly

deny

that there

is

any fuch

thing

in

the

world.

The

will,

though in

it

felf

radically free, yet

in

refpe£t

of

the

term or

obje&,

to which

in

this

regard

it

Mould

tend,

is

corrupted, enthralled,

and under

a

miferablebondage, tied to,

fucha

neceffìty

of

finning

in general,

that though

unregenerate men are not refirained,

to

this,

or

that

fin

in particular,

yet

for

the

main,

they can

do

nothing but

fin.

All

their altions wherein

there

is

any

morality, areattended with iniquity,

an evil

tree can-

not bring

forth

good

fruit,

even

the

[artifice

of

the wicked

is

an abomination

to

the

Lord.

Ù

There