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I2

The Life

of

GOD

mine then1: and the not corifidering

this,

cloth frequently occafion very dangerous

n1ifiakes, making men think well of

theln–

felves by reafon of that feeming difference

·which is betwixt them and others; where–

as perhaps their actions do all the while

. flow fron1 one and the fame original.

If

we confider the natural temper and con–

fiitution of mens fouls, we fhall find fome

to be airy, frolickfom, . and light, which

1nakes their behaviour extravagant and ri–

diculous ; whereas others are naturally fe–

rions and fevere, and their whole carriage

compofed into fuch gravity as gains

~hen1

a great deal of reverence and efieem. Son1e

are of an hun1orous, rugged, and morofe

temper, and can neither

be

pleafed ·rhenl–

fel)!eS, nor endure that others fhould be

fo.

But all are not born with fuch

four

and

unhappy difpofitions;

for fome per–

fan)) have a certain fweetnefs and benigt1ity

· rooted

in

the1r

natures, and they find the

grcat.eft

pleafure .

in

the e11dearments of fo-:–

ciety, and

the

mutual complacency

of

friends, and covet nothing more than to

have every body obliged to

them.

And

it

is

\vell that .nature hath

provided

this

con1plexional tendernefs

to

fupply

the de–

fect of true charity in

th-e

world, and to

incline tnen to do

fon1ething

for one

apo-

ther's