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N

azarite

s, types

of

aril,.

153

would eats nothing

till

all

his

temptations

in

the wilder

-

ne{fe

were

ended,

As

of

all

other

vermes,

fo

he

was

an

unfailing

patterne in this

of

holy

abstinence

and

unvio-

lated temperance.

I

I

I.

The

Nazarites

were

enjoyned to

let

their

haire

grow,

and

no

razor

mutt come

on their

heads all

the

time

of

their

vow

and

feperation, Numb.6.

5.

By

which

ceremony

the

Lord

intended

two

things.

t

.

He

would

have

them molt unlike and contrary

to

the

religi-

ous

orders

of

the

heathen

Idolaters,

who

ufuallynourt-

fhed

their haire

to

offer

in

facrifce to their gods,

as in

many

examples I

could

(hew

:

But

thefe

mutt

not dimi-

nifh their

haire

all

the

time

;

and

when they

cut

it off

they

muff

bane

it

with

fire.

2.

To

be

a

meanes

to

avoid

finenefle and delicacy

in

curious

trimming

of

the

head,and

care

of

the

flea),

which

is

a

great

enemy

to re-

ligious

thoughts and

exercifes.

So

the

Apottle implyes,

the more

care

of

the

pg.!, the

leffe

of

putting

on

Chrsft

left'''.

3.

Long haire

in

men

is

a

ligne

of

ftrength,

as in

Sampfc».And

by

this

law the Lord would

put

them

in

mind that

as

they

were

to

avoid

effeminate

foftneffe

and

delicacy

;

fo

to

be

manly,

ftrang,

and

couragiotas

in

performing

duties,

and refitting ftcurly

all

the

tempta-

tions

and baits

that might

allure

them from

the

duty

un-

dertaken.

As

for our

Saviour

(whom

they

fhadowed)it

is

not

likely he nourifhed

his'haire,

becaufe

the

Apoftle

faith,it

was

(in

that

age) uncomèly

for

men

to

have

long

haire.

%f

a

man

have

long

hare

it

id

a fhame

unto

him.

And

then

are

all the

lkomifh paynters

quite out, who

paint him

with

his

haire

lying

round

about

his

fhoulders:

but

Painters'and Poets may

lye by

authority.

It

was e-

nough for

him,

that

he was

a

Nazarite

in

the

truth

and

fubflance

of

that

although

not'in

the

letter

and

out-

ward

ceremony

of

it.

In

which

refpef

how did

he neg-

lei

himfelfe;who

being the Lord

of

all,denyed

himfclfe

of

all

rights

and

comforts. He

w

as

fo

farrefrom-all de

}i-

cacy,

Nouriihiná

the

hake.

R.om,

1344.

z

Cori

r.r4

Pic`íoribus

atque

PoetitQuidiGet

atsdertdt

fenper

fait

ægteotpote-

pod.

Tor,