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z6

Ifaac a

type

of

Chri.

;

.

Et

lfaae

cbripta

e,

at,ejr

aries

Ch.

rzftus

erat.

I

raac fibi

ligna

portabat:Chriflus

crucem propria.4

baitelabai.

Pro

Ifaac wies,

&c.

Aug.

Aa.z.

&

4.

Cerva

matutie4.

Ob

melis

mag-

nitudinem.

Obpeccatorum

mote?".

I

I I.

In

his offering,

r

.

Both

formes,

onely fons,in-

nocent,beloved

of

their fathers:Abraham did

al

at

Gods

Comrnaudement,

and

lifted up his hand

:

So

Chrift

by

the

determinate

cornfell

of

God

was

delivered

by

wick-

ed

hands.

Abraham

offers his Sonne freely

:

God

more

freely

offers

his

forme

out

of

his

bofome..

2.

Abra-

ham by

Gods

conamiffion

rifeth

early

in

the

morning

to

facrifice his

forme

;

and

If<tzc

rifeth

as

early

to

obey

his

Father

:

So

the

jewes

by

Gods

permiflion breake

their

fleepe,

and early

in

the

morning

proceed

to the

condem-

ning

of

Chrift, who

is

called

the

Hinde

of

the morning.

PAZ

2.1.

compafed

withdogges

that hunted

his life;

and

Chrift,

as

another

Ifaac, after

his paillon

role

early

in

the morning

to

fulfill

the worke

of

his Father.

3. Neither

of

them

muft be

offered

every

where

or

any

where but both

in

a

mountaine,

and fuch

a

moun-

taine

as

mull

typifie

Chritts

humane nature.

Mount

Moriah muft

beare

the

Temple built

by

Salomon,

a

type.

of

Chrifls body,Iób.z.

i

9.Mount

Calvary

mull

beare

the

body

it

felfe; and

the

fe

two

hills,

if

they

be

not

one and

the

fame (as 4ugtsffine

thinkes,

and

it

is

not

unprobable

but

that Golgotha

was

the skirt

of

Moriah) yet

could

they

not

be

farre

diflant,

the one

being

within

the gate

of

the

City,

and

the other

not

farre

without, the

neareft

to

the

City

of

all.

4.

The Father

layes

firft

the

wood

upon

both

,

and

then both

upon

the

wood, both

muff

feele

the

weight

of

the

wood,

no

fsnall

wood

to

burne

a

man,

a

whole burnt

offering

as

Ifaac

:

but the

wood

which

Chrift

bore was

farre

heavier.

i.

For the

greatneffe

of

the burthen.

z.

For

the

burthenfome

neffe

of

our

finnes,Ifiry

S

3.4.he bare

411

our

difeafes.

And

then

both

by

Gods

appoyntment

were

bound

on

the

wood,

fattened

hand

and

foot, not

that either

was

un-

willing,

but

to

retaine

the

manner appointed for

facri-

fice.

S.

Ifaac

muft

be offered

alone,

the

fervants muff

flay at

the foot

of

the

hill

a

farre

off,

little knowing the

bufinefle