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MEllntas

OF

nit.

vans.

salons

and

theapplication they made of them tothe

service of

the

church

and

of

civil

society, cannot

fail

to administer instruction.

Every

candidate

fortlie

work

of

the sanctuary,

who feels as

he ought the

importance

of his designa-

tion, and who, having finished

his preparatory

obligations, will owe

much

of

his best

assistance to

thelight

reflectedupon him from

these

luminaries.

Some,

if

not all,

of these

advantages, will be obtained from

the

life

of

Dr.

Watts

;

if

perused with such dispositions,

as

gave

that

life

all

its

lustre,

What

is

said

of another

eminent man, will with

equal

truth

apply to him

:

As

anatomy discovers

all

the curious contexture of our bodily fabric,

so

here

are

vivid representations

of

faith, love, and an heavenly

mind;

of

humility,

meekness, self

-

denial, entire

resignation

to

the

will

of

God,

in

their

first and

continued

motions

;

with whatever parts

and principles besides, compose

the

whole frame

of the new creature.

fiere

it

is as

if

we could perceive with our

eyes,

how

the

blood

circulates in

an human

body

through all

the

veins

and

arteries

;

how

the

heart heats,the animalspirits

fly to and fro, and how

each

nerve, tendon, fibre, andmuscle, performs

itsseveral

operations.

Here it may

be

seen, howan

heart

touched from above, works and

tends.thitherward: how

It

depresses

itself

in

humiliation, dilates

itself

in love, exalts

itself

in

praise,

submits itself under chastisement, and how

it

draws in its refreshments and

succours

as

there

is

need. To many who have seen

so

amiable

a

course

of

life, howgrateful will it be

to behold

the secret

motions

of those

inward

latent

principles, from whence

all

proceed! Though others

would look no

further

than the

advantages

(in

externalrespects)

that

accrue

from it. So some con-

tent

themselves,

to know

by

a

clock

the

hourof the day,

or

partake

the

bene-

ficial

use

of

some

rarer engine; the more curious,

especially

any that design

imitation, and

fo compose

something

of the

same kind, would bemuch more

gratified,

if through

some pellucid enclosure,

they

couldbehold

all the

inward

work,

and observe

how every wheel,spring, or movement, perform

their

sere-

KM

partsand

offices,

towards

that

common use

*.

But

to him whose

only

object

is

entertainment, the subsequent Memoirs

will

afford

but

little

gratification.

Extraordinary

incidents, and curious

anec-

dotes, are not to be expected in

the

life

of

a

man, whose excursions were

bounded by a few miles in

the

neighbourhood

of the metropolis;

who

had

formed

no

domestic relations

;

whose bodily afflictions, often and for

long sea-

sons, incapacitated him

for

every

duty,

and for

every pleasure, but such as

were purely intellectual and spiritual

;

and who, when in

health, perhaps

rather

shunned social intercourse,

as incompatible with

his literary pursuits

and

his ministerial obligations.

But

whoever is capable

of appreciating the

importance

of

learning

and philosophy,

when sanctified by

an ardentzeal

for

the glory of

God,

by gentleness, humility, and unremitted exertions

for

the

best interests

of

the

world

;

or whoever possesses

the noble

ambition

of

at-

taining sucheminence in

wisdom,

piety, and usefulness,

and

of

imbibing

any

degree of

that

elevation

of

mind,

so

conspicuous

in

this

great

man,

may anti-

cipate more substantial rarities,

the

zest

of

which he

will

never lose, while

he

needsthe aid of instruction,or

the

animating

influence

of

an example

so

full

ofgrace and beauty.

Iasse

WATTS,

the eldest

of

nine children, wasborn

July

17,

1674,

at

Southampton.

If

his family connections did not possess the advantages

of

affluence,

they

were such

as

might

have secured him against

the

prejudice

a

Howe